Thatching

  Homeowners commonly attribute lawn problems to insect problems, insufficient fertilization, or even diseases. But actually what is happening is the top few inches (10 cm) of soil become compacted. Nutrients, such as water and air, have a difficult time reaching the roots of your lawn.
 

In this case, the grass on the surface may begin to die or show signs that can easily be misdiagnosed. The thatch on your lawn can be your biggest hindrance in growing a vibrant and healthy lawn. If your lawn is left untreated it will result in a lot of your time and effort wasted for a minimal result.

A common remedy for this problem is to de-thatch your yard. With thatch removed, air, water, nutrients, herbicides and pesticides can do their job. Turf becomes healthier and more resistant to insect damage and disease.

Thatching is the removal of old, tired, grass and moss. The process I use is called "Power Raking." Thatching can be done by hand, but this is very tiring and cumbersome.

The best time to thatch is in the fall and late spring when your lawn is dry and the thatch is light and fluffy. This allows me to remove the maximum amount of thatch, while minimizing stress to your lawn.

With thatch removed, air, water, nutrients, herbicides and pesticides can do their job more efficiently. Turf becomes healthier and more resistant to insect damage and disease.

The best way to insure a healthy lawn in spring is to properly prepare your lawn for winter. By thatching, seeding, aerating and fertilizing in fall, your lawn is able to resist winter moss, water damage and crane fly infestation. Dethatching at regular intervals promotes denser growth and ensures the vibrancy and resiliency of your lawn.